The Alamo

Misunderstood By:

Texans, underdogs everywhere.

The Alamo was the site of the last stand of several influential American frontiersmen like David Crockett and Jim Bowie, against an overwhelming force of Mexican Troops. Though a loss for Texas, it inspired the revolution that finally led to their glorious independence.

As the Alamo’s website puts it, “People worldwide continue to remember the Alamo as a heroic struggle against impossible odds – a place where men made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom.” And what a freedom it was! Except for the 5,000 or so slaves who could now legally be declared personal property.

People who say “Remember the Alamo” conveniently neglect to remember that a considerable factor in the Texas Revolution was that dastardly Mexico decided to outlaw slavery, and that didn’t wash well with the American slave-owning population, who needed them black folk to pick their cotton while they laid back on the porch sipping margaritas from coconut halves.

Hell, if you want an inspirational symbol for standing up for freedom against overwhelming odds, how about John Brown’s Raid on Harpers Ferry? John Brown was a radical militant abolitionist who launched areal last stand for liberty in 1859. Taking along 20 other men, including freed slaves, he raided the federal arsenal at Harper’s Ferry. By seizing the nation’s supply of guns and ammunition, he hoped to initiate a slave revolt and uprising. As seen here:

Despite evidently being 12-feet tall and made of bronze, Brown’s mission failed and he was later executed for treason, becoming a symbol and martyr for the struggle against slavery.

While we’re on Texas…

Back to The Alamo Project: Plays.

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